News

After mid-terms, states may reconsider Medicaid expansion

About half of the states had been staunchly opposed to expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, but watching billions of federal dollars flow to their neighbors has apparently softened their stance on the matter, Kaiser Health News has reported.

Bay Area hospitals use fuzzy math on community benefits reporting

Where have all the community benefits gone? That's a question asked by the Berkeley, CA-based Greenlining Institute, which recently examined how hospitals in San Francisco were expending their community benefits. Greenlining could not find much of an answer.

Are hospitals being punished by Medicare for treating poor patients?

Medicare may penalize many hospitals for patient readmissions due to circumstances that are beyond their control, according to Forbes contributor Peter Ubel.

Consumer-driven healthcare could help empty hospital beds

The shift toward consumer-driven healthcare could wind up cutting the number of patients receiving care via the hospital inpatient setting by as much as 40 percent over the long term, according to a new report by the Oliver Wyman consulting firm.

CMS clarifies short-stay claims settlement offer

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has issued an update on its settlement process with providers regarding disputed short-term hospital claims

A dozen fees providers may soon charge patients

Now that hospitals and other providers have become highly invested in nickel-and-diming their patients with fees that have little to do with the care they actually provide (they're also in...

Hospital malpractice costs continue to rise

The average hospital liability claim is approaching $500,000, according to new data from the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management.

Providers devise new fees to levy against patients

Challenged by insurers ratcheting down their payments, hospitals and medical groups are creating more fees and charges for patients to pay as part of the care they receive, The New York Times reported.

HRSA asks drug manufacturers to refund 340B overcharges

The Health Resources and Services Administration had decided that orphan drugs--often pricey medications used to treat rare diseases--should be provided in some instances to hospitals that participate in the 340B program at its permitted discount, according to AHA News Now.

Ebola preparation is costly for hospitals

As hospitals scramble to properly prepare for any further outbreaks of the Ebola virus in the United States, they are bumping up against the inevitable barrier: cost. Hospitals are finding that merely preparing for the narrow possibility of treating an Ebola patient can cost them hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Social impact bonds can finance public health initiatives

Public health initiatives are being more widely financed with private investors, Kaiser Health News has reported. "Pay for success" or "social impact bonds" originated in the United Kingdom, although they are getting some purchase in the United States.

HHS pledges $840 million for care improvement

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is pledging $840 million over the next four years to fund initiatives that would improve the quality of healthcare delivery while lowering its costs.

Direct hospital contracting in Maine dramatically cuts costs

Direct contracting by employer groups of hospital services may be a way to dramatically reduce costs.

Use of reference pricing is likely to grow

Reference pricing--a cap on what payers would cover for certain medical procedures--is slowly gaining traction in the healthcare sector, Kaiser Health News reports.

Hospitals that switch to for-profit status do not harm patient care

When not-for-profit hospitals switch to for-profit status, their finances may improve but the quality of care they deliver remains about the same, concludes a new study from Harvard researchers.

Texas Health Presbyterian financial losses become clearer

Following published reports suggesting that Texas Health Presbyterian, the Dallas hospital that accidentally allowed two of its nurses to be infected with the Ebola virus from a patient, had taken a financial hit as a result, Bloomberg has quantified the loss: a 20 percent-plus drop in its revenue and patient census.

Ebola in US could have shed light on hospital medical errors--but it hasn't

The Ebola virus' history in the United States has been quite limited: One overseas and two domestic infections in total, far fewer than the number of people in the country who will die today...

VHA division serves hospitals in Midwest looking to cut costs

The VHA has created Mid-American Service Solutions, which is focused on Midwestern acute care facilities and has about 120 in its purchasing group altogether, the Topeka Capital-Journal reported.

GOP senators warn ACA will increase budget woes

Will the Affordable Care Act actually add to the deficit in the coming years? Congressional Republicans, according to a recent Forbes op-ed piece, are now asserting the ACA will add $131 billion to the federal deficit over the next decade, negating promises made by President Barack Obama.

Two health system CEOs will share top spot after merger

A shared office of the chief executive officer is the key to a smooth merger between two of New Jersey's leading hospital systems, NJ Biz has reported.